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and earth to get one mar man. and you said we should ask pakistan for permission. and if we had asked pakistan for permission, we would not have gotten it and it was worth moving heaven and earth to get him. after we killed bin laden i was ground zero for a memphis and talked to a young woman who was four years old -- 4 years old when 9/11 happened and the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers. saying, i love you and i will always watch over you. and for the next decade she was haunted by that conversation and she said to me, you know, by finally getting bin laden, that brought some closure to me. and when we do things like that, when we bring those who have harmed us to justice, that sends a message to the world and it tells peyton that we did not forget her father. and i make that point because that's the kind of clarity of leadership and those decisions are not always popular. those decisions genuine -- generally are not poll tested. and even some in my own party, including my current vice president had the same critique as you did. but what
an outpouring of international and pakistan the support. she is being treated at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. >> she leaves a military hospital after almost a week of emergency treatment. her destination, britain. this after then, she arrived at birmingham airport. the ambulance driving slowly through the streets to the queen elizabeth hospital. hear, a large number of doctors ought hand with years of experience treating british soldiers wounded in afghanistan. >> she will be assessed by range of specialists and a variety of other teams, which is clearly why she is coming here. >> she was well known for speaking out against the militant group. in particular, the campaign to stop girls going to school in her home region. she started writing a diary for the bbc three years ago when they controlled the valley. last week, the militants took their revenge, shooting her in the head. the attack has sparked angry demonstrations in pakistan. people here and around the world horrified that they are targeting such a young girl. >> there has been a wave of public revulsion in pakistan and
of pakistan to britain for the girl that the taliban tried to kill. both countries promised the best possible care for her. there were fears for her security. welcome to gmt. i'm david eades. is the end in sight for the philippines in their long battle with rebels? tracking the whereabouts of a sex offender. western australia has allowed parents to access its list of convicted pedophiles. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the evening in manila, 4:00 in the afternoon in islamabad. the pakistani teenager malala yousafzai is being flown to the uk for specialist treatment after being shot in the head last week by the taliban because the 14-year-old was campaigning for the right of girls to go to school for. she need prolonged care including intensive be rehabilitation. with the taliban still threatening to kill her if she survives, the case has horrified many people in pakistan and around the world. now the latest. >> she began her journey in the early hours. doctors say they have done everything they can and now will rely on the u.k. to help oust. -- out. the teenager had been well known for writin
. and you said we should ask pakistan for permission. and if we had asked pakistan permission, we would not have gotten him. it was worth moving and heaven and earth to get him. after we killed bin laden, i was at ground zero for a memorial and talked to a young woman who was four years old when 9/11 happened. and the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers saying peyton, i love you and i will always watch over you. and for the next decade, she was haunted by that conversation. and she said to me, you know, by finally getting bin laden, that brought some closure to me. and when we do things like that, when we bring those who have harmed us to justice, that sends a message to the world and it tells peyton that we did not forget her father. >> all right. >> and i make that point because that's the kind of clarity of leadership and those decisions are not always popular. those decisions generally are not poll tested and even some in my own party including my current vice president had the same critique as you did. but what the american people understa
pakistan for permission we would not have got him. it was worth moving heaven and earth to get him. give up, after which of bin laden, i was at ground zero for a memorial and talk to a young woman who was four years old when 9/11 happen. and the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers saying i love you, i will always watch over you. and for the next decade she was haunted by that conversation. and she said to me, you know, by finally getting bin laden that brought some closure to me. and when we do things like that, we bring those who have harmed us to justice that sends a message to the world, and it tells peyton thus we cannot forget her father. and i made that point because that of the kind of clarity of leadership and those decisions are not only do those decisions generally a couple test. and even some of my own party including my current vice- president at the same critique as you did. but what the american people understand is that i look at what we need to get done to keep the american people safe and to move our interest forward. >> all right
level in nearly four years. and protesting the planned in pakistan at the growing use of unmanned drones -- protesting the plan in pakistan. >> bond. james bond. >> the spy with enduring appeal. 50 years after 007 hit the big screen, we look back at the man and his martinis. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of gloomy financial news, tonight, some encouraging signs that america's economy is gaining momentum and creating more jobs. figures out today show unemployment has dropped to its lowest rate in almost four years. 12 million americans are still out of work, but falling unemployment has surprised most analysts. both barack obama and mitt romney were quick to seize on the numbers. here is our north america editor. >> snow in downtown denver slow down the rush hour, that millions of americans have no need form morning haste -- no need for morning haze. how to create more jobs has been central for this election. unemployment rose after barack obama became president, peaking at just over 10%. today's figure is the first time it has been under
television in america and also around the globe. today people in pakistan observed a day of prayer for malala yousafzai. she is a 14-year-old girl shot in the head by the taliban. her crime was to campaign for girls like herself to have an education. the attack has been condemned across the globe. our journalist was the first to report from her home town. >> prayers across pakistan have been dedicated to malala. the 14-year-old remains in critical condition, three days after a taliban assassin shot her in the head. just two weeks ago the girl that has become the focus of worldwide attention was filmed at home, helping her younger brother with his work. it is for her own writings she became famous. the school flag flies at half mast. the students do not know when she will return here to her desk. everywhere there is evidence of the accolades she won defining the taliban and campaigning for girls' education. the biology told us of the horror of the attack, showing us the school band she was traveling on when the gunmen climbed on board and targeted her. the blood stain. but she was not the only
about islam and the difference between jan and now duty. >> he was a lawyer in the time where pakistan was part of british india and part of the long fight for independence. he was a secular politicians. i do not believe he used that word. he gave a famous speech in which he said to this country which was mostly muslim but had millions of hindus and many other kinds of people, that the state has business that is separate from religion. you were free to go to your temples, you're mosques, but they are separate. we are not going to discriminate based on color, cast, or creed. it was an amazing the progressive speech in 1947. it would have been an amazingly progressive speech in the united states at the time. that was one vision of how to have a majority muslim country. the other vision is represented in my book and i believe in history by the founder of a muslim party, and the islamist party, that remains in pakistan today. it is powerful and has spawned other parties over the years. you could call him a fundamentalist. i do not see that word used in this period, either. he believed peop
in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action. the scene outside the supreme court building made clear just how anticipated this case has been. for the first time in nearly a decade, the justices are considering whether it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor ro
markets to grow. even so, pakistan doesn't seem like an obvious choice. headlines from there often focus on political chaos and terrorism. discouraged a group of japanese companies from taking a closer look. nhk world reports from islamabad. >> reporter: siakot is a city in east pakistan. at this garment factory, 150 men make uniforms for judo and karate. they work for japanese companies that moved its base here from china. >> translator: we are starting to receive orders from companies in europe, as well as japan. because of rising costs in china. >> reporter: pakistan's population is said to keep growing for the foreseeable future. more and more japanese companies see it as a promising market. the japanese company has formed a joint venture with local firm. their new factory began operations this month. the manufacture used in automobiles and electric appliances. >> translator: this is a huge market of 1 0 million people. but steel consumption is just 38 kilograms. we can expect usage of steel to grow sharply as more people buy cars, motor bikes, and appliances. >> reporter: the bigges
, and you should we should ask pakistan for permission. if we asked pakistan for permission, we would not have gotten him. it was worth moving heaven and earth to get him. after we killed bin laden i was at ground zero for a memorial and talked of a young woman who was four years old when 9/11 happened, and the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers saying, peyton, i love you, and i will always watch over you, and for the next decade she was haunted by that conversation and she said to me, you know, by finally getting billibin laden, that brought closure to me. when we too things like that, that sends a message to the world and tells peyton that we did not forget her father and i make that point because that's the kind of clarity of leadership and those decisions are not always popular. those decisions generally are not poll tested, and even some in my own party including my current vice president have the same critique as you did. but what the american people understand is that i look at what we need to get done to keep the american people safe
ask pakistan permission. after we killed bin ladin i was at ground zero for a memorial and talked to a young woman who was four years old when 9/11 happened, and the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers, saying payton, i love you, and i will always watch over you. and for the next decade she was haunted by that conversation, she said to me, you know by finally getting bin ladin that brought some closure to me. when we do things like that, when we bring those who have harmed us to justice, that sends a message to the world. and it tells payton that we did not forget her father. i make that point because that's the kind of clarity of leadership, and those decisions are not always popular. those decisions generally are not poll tested. even some in my own party, including my current vice president had the same critique as you did. what the american people understand is, i look at what we need to get done to keep the american people safe and move our interests forward and i make those decisions. >> okay. >> let's go, and that leads us to the n
. >>> the weak global economy is forcing companies to look for new markets to grow. even so, pakistan doesn't seem like an obvious choice. that hasn't discouraged a group of japanese companies from taking a closer look. >> a city in eastern pakistan. a garment factory, 150 men make uniforms for judo and karate. they work for a japanese company that moved its production base here in july from china. >> translator: we are starting to receive orders from companies in europe as well as japan because of rising costs in china. >> pakistan's population is said to keep growing for the foreseeable future. more and more japanese companies see it as a promising market a japanese company has formed a joint venture with a local firm. their new factory began operations this month. a proud manufacture -- >> this is a huge market of 1 will 0 million people. the per capita kwon assumption is just 130 kilograms. we can expect steel to grow sharply. >> the biggest obstacle to doing business in pakistan is poor security. in the southern city of karachi, gun crime is rampant. in karachi, when japanese people go
in pakistan, outrage we should all welcome over the attempted assassination by the taliban of a 14-year-old girl simply because she wanted an education. because she wanted an education for herself and other girls like her. we will update you on her medical condition and bring you the latest from pakistan. buying this juicer online was unbelievable. what a bargain! [ female announcer ] sometimes a good deal turns out to be not such a good deal. but bounty gives you value you can see. in this lab demo, one sheet of bounty leaves this surface cleaner than two sheets of the leading ordinary brand. so you can clean this mess with half as many sheets. bounty has trap and lock technology to soak up big spills and lock them in. why use more when you can use less? bounty. the clean picker upper. and these come together, one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page
is not in the business of self-prop pization. there needs to be a time line. when do we stop, leave, in haiti, pakistan, anywhere in the world. time line to zero. vitally important, she said that. second thing back to the question, had to do with corruption. she talked about corruption as an obstacle to development, but title lined directly between corruption in poor countries and corruption in the united states inside the beltway crags -- contracts that are fed back. we can talk about a lot of other systems, and tieing that line that we are also part of the world, subject to the same forces of economic interests capturing the political process, getting government contracts, and effecting outcomes. we are also subject to that. to see her say those things, you know, it more than what i say in my book. what you say is true and deeply important. >> host: philip auerswald, you write about the current telecommunications revolutions we're all living through and trying to understand and manage. help us. >> guest: well, okay. so first of all, we have to understand the difference between a mobile phone and a ri
should be should not move heaven and earth to get one man. you said we should ask pakistan for permission. and it was worth moving heaven and earth to get it. after we killed osama bin laden, i was at ground zero for a memorial and talked to a young woman who was four when 9/11 happened in the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers saying i love you and i will always walked over you. -- awtch over you -- watch over you. the next decade, she was haunted by the conversation. finally getting osama bin laden bought some closure to me, she said. when we bring those to of harm to us to justice, that sends a message to the world and it tells her that we did not forget her father. i make that point because that is the kind of clarity of leadership and those decisions are not always popular. they are generally not pull tested. even some in my own party, including my current vice- president, had the same critique as you did. but what the american people understand is that i look at what we need to get done to keep the american people safe and to move our inte
for treatment of gunshot wounds while her classmates in pakistan vow they won't be stopped. reports from charlie d'agata and elizabeth palmer. wyatt andrews on the romney tax plan. >> i will not under any circumstances raise taxes on middle-income families. >> pelley: do his numbers add up? that meningitis outbreak from tainted steroids may be just the beginning. now dr. jon lapook reports other drugs could be contaminated. and bob orr with the notes president kennedy wrote when the world faced nuclear war 50 years ago. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. for us today the most compelling story in the world involves a 14-year-old girl fighting for her life. she held up a light against the darkness of ignorance and now millions around the world are watching to see if she will die for her cause. malala yousafzai was taken today to a british hospital for treatment of a gunshot wound to the head. a week ago in pakistan a taliban gunman climbed aboard her school bus to assassinate her because of her long campaign to open schools to mor
heaven and earth to find one man, and we should ask pakistan for permission. after we killed bin laden i was at ground zero for a memorial and talked to a young woman who was four years old when 9/11 happened. and the last conversation she had with her father was him calling from the twin towers saying peyton i love you, and i will always watch over you. and for the next decade she was haunted by that conversation, and she said by finally getting bin laden that brought some closure to me. and when we the things like that, bring those who have harmed us to justice that seconds a message to the world, and it tells peyton we did not forget her father and that's the kind of clarity of leadership, and those decisions are not always popular. those decisions generally are not poll tested. and even some in my own party had the same critique as you do but what the american people understand is that i look at what we need to get done to keep the american people safe and move our interest forward, and i make those decisions. >> all right. let's go, and this takes us righ
star status today, news that a muslim from pakistan had bought the jaguars did not go over well with everyone in this conservative corner of northeast florida. in comments quoted in online media, khan was called, among other things a "terrorist from pakistan," a "sand monkey." one person asked, "if you buy a jags season ticket, does it come with a prayer rug?" how'd you react to that? >> khan: ah, well, you know, the way i reacted most of my life, which is it's not really my problem; it's their problem. it was not jacksonville's finest moment. >> pitts: so it's true that the former owner, wayne weaver, was so embarrassed that he offered you a chance to get out of the deal? >> khan: well, please, i wouldn't characterize it that way. i think he was surprised. and he wanted to just make sure that, you know, it wasn't giving me pause. >> pitts: and it gave you none at all? khan: none whatsoever. it was like... as a matter of fact, if it was possible for me to be more determined, it, you know, gave me more determination. >> pitts: that determination can be traced back to a childhood
in the head by pakistan taliban. the "new york times" reporter who knows her well will join me. the woman who is trying to save the world from bat crap crazy congressman joe walsh, democratic congressional candidate and war veteran tammy joins me. and in the rewrite tonight. lingerie. the kind that mitt romney hates the most. chinese lingerie. we will give mitt romney another little lesson from "the west wing." now find the most hard core driver in america. that guy, put him in it. what's this? [ male announcer ] tell him he's about to find out. you're about to find out. [ male announcer ] test it. highlight the european chassis, 6 speed manual, dual exhaust, wide stance, clean lines, have him floor it, spin it, punch it, drift it, put it through its paces, is he happy? oh ya, he's happy! [ male announcer ] and that's how you test your car for fun. easy. going to talk tough about china in monday night's debate. that's in the rewrite tonight. and karen finney and richard wolf will join me next. and congress yaul candidate tammy duck worth joins me when her opponent continues to evolve his opin
being shot in the head by pakistan taliban. the "new york times" reporter who knows her well will join me. the woman who is trying to save the world from bat crap crazy congressman joe walsh, democratic congressional candidate and war veteran tammy joins me. and in the rewrite tonight. lingerie. the kind that mitt romney hates the most. chinese lingerie. we will give mitt romney another little lesson from "the west wing." [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> you know mitt romney is going to talk tough about china in monday night's debate. that's in the rewrite tonight. and karen finney and richard wolf will join me next. and congressional candidate tammy duck worth joins me when her opponent continues to evolve his opinion on abortion to save the life of the mother. he was opposed to it yesterday and not quite so opposed to it today. i don't spend mone
of ground strikes may be undermining security objectives in places like yemen and pakistan. peter bird and and christopher swift discuss the move from partitive killings to signature strikes, which target groups ahead of men associated with terrorists. according to research, and grown strikes in pakistan have increased from one every 40 days during the bush administration to one every four days. this is from the center for national policy. >> good afternoon. my name is gregory aftandilian. i am a senior fellow for the middle east here at the center for national policy. on behalf of our chairman, and our president, i want to welcome all of you here today. i also want to welcome c-span for covering this event. the event is titled, "death from above." as many of you are aware, drone attacks started under the bush administration but have been accelerated under the obama administration. they seem to be the main weapon of the united states against al qaeda and its affiliates in pakistan. we argue that drones have been effective, according to data. somewhere between 1597 have been killed by d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,374 (some duplicates have been removed)